Royal Air Force Association

Charity registered in Scotland SC037673

RAFA, The Royal Air Forces Association (or RAF Association), is a membership organisation and registered
charity that provides welfare support to the RAF Family. We give real help to real people – this is the core of
the welfare work that the RAF Association so successfully delivers and is making a real difference to the
lives of those in the RAF family who find themselves in times of need. The support we provide relies heavily
on the fantastic work carried out by our volunteers and the many different ways that they help
including welfare support and fundraising.


Current opportunities

A Caseworker is someone who carries out welfare work for the Royal Air Forces Association. Welfare work is about listening to an individual and assessing their needs to find out how the Association can provide help and support to them. Caseworker volunteers are put in touch with members of the RAF family (beneficiaries) who need our support and are then responsible for arranging visits with those individual beneficiaries and assessing where support is needed, through asking pertinent questions and listening to beneficiaries’ responses. Caseworkers then submit verbal and written reports to their AWO who will work together with the volunteer to ensure a successful outcome for the beneficiary. . Support can include anything from helping put a beneficiary with a disability in touch with social services, so they can apply for funding for a wet room, to something as simple as filling in a form to get a new fridge, for a beneficiary who cannot afford to replace their broken one. It could also be informing beneficiaries of the holiday breaks the Association offers, in one of its three Wings Break hotels. Caseworkers may also need to gather complex information on beneficiaries to help with applications for care home fees or similar and this can involve providing clear and precise information on finances and correspondences. Caseworkers work with ‘beneficiaries’, who are members of the RAF family. What is the desired outcome of this volunteer role? The RAF Association is a member-led, welfare charity that exists to ensure that all members of the RAF family are supported, when they require it. The Caseworker’s role is at the heart of this charity objective and volunteers undertaking this role will be helping us to deliver this support to the RAF family. Who do Caseworkers report to? Caseworker volunteers will report to their local Area Welfare Officer (AWO). There are nine AWOs in the UK and volunteers will report to the one closest to them. How does it work? For more information on the process involved in being a Caseworker, please refer to our ‘Additional information for Caseworker volunteers’ information sheet. In summary, Caseworker volunteers are put in touch with members of the RAF family (beneficiaries) who need our support and are then responsible for arranging visits with those individual beneficiaries and assessing where support is needed, through asking pertinent questions and listening to beneficiaries’ responses. Caseworkers then submit verbal and written reports to their AWO who will work together with the volunteer to ensure a successful outcome for the beneficiary. In summary, a Caseworker will: • Visit potential beneficiaries, listen to their concerns and assess their needs • Identify areas of support and make referrals to partner agencies as required • Record visits and maintain good records of activities, recommendations and actions • Record requests for financial assistance via the Content Management System (CMS) • Undertake follow up visits as required • Provide regular updates to the AWO • Complete monthly returns cataloguing their activity How will I be given feedback? You will be given individual feedback on your completed forms and reports, to help you learn and develop your skills, as well as ensuring that our beneficiaries are provided with the professional and knowledgeable service they deserve. The AWO responsible for you will also discuss with you how you are managing your case load and assist you with any issues that may arise. All Caseworker volunteers will be informed as a group about the overall outcomes, in the area, of the welfare volunteers’ work and what the ongoing aims are, to ensure we continue to support every member of the RAF family in that region, that needs our help.

Befriender volunteers are required to meet with a beneficiary to help alleviate loneliness and isolation, listen to and engage with the beneficiary, promoting positive outlooks and raising self esteem. Regularly meet with a beneficiary, either in their home or at a mutually agreed location. Listen to and engage with the beneficiary, promoting positive outlooks and raised self-esteem. Research into local community groups and activities to find relevant interests for the beneficiary. Identify any additional areas of support and make referrals to the Area Welfare Manager if required. Keep a note of visits undertaken, with recommendations and actions.

A befriender volunteer carries out visits to and keeps in touch with members of the RAF Family (beneficiary), on behalf of the RAF Association. Befriender volunteers exist to provide companionship and outcome focused support to a beneficiary and to ensure that they remain part of the community and feel socially connected to the wider RAF family. They are required to: - regularly meet with a beneficiary, either in their home or at a mutually agreed location. - Listen to and engage with the beneficiary, promoting positive outlooks and help raise self esteem. - work within the remit of the Befriending Plan and promote activities to meet the identified outcomes. - Research into local community groups and activities to find relevant interests for the beneficiary. - Identify any additional areas of support and make referrals to the Area Welfare Manager - keep a note of visits undertaken, with recommendations and actions. Provide this information and regular updates to the AWM. Being a befriender volunteer could be about helping someone who is isolated through the use of social media or visiting an older person that has become increasingly isolated over time and to help find them new interests in the community The role is varied, the service spans all ages and it is flexible to suit everyone.