Butterfly Trust (The)

Charity registered in Scotland SC033174

Cystic Fibrosis is a progressive, life limiting genetically inherited condition with 1 in 25 people carrying the faulty gene that causes the condition. There is currently no cure for Cystic Fibrosis. The Butterfly Trust is the leading provider of social support to the Cystic Fibrosis community of Scotland. We were founded in 2002 to provide face to face services for people with Cystic Fibrosis and their families. Our aim is that people living with Cystic Fibrosis will have access to the support they need to ensure they can benefit from optimum homecare and enjoy the best quality of life in the community.


Current opportunities

The Butterfly Trust are the lead providing agency of social support for Scotland's Cystic Fibrosis community. We are looking for pro-active, enthusiastic volunteers to support our fundraising team at public collections, bag packs and to place/collect static collection cans in the community. The role involves: Attending collections in supermarkets, football grounds and street collections Attending bag packs in supermarkets Placing & collecting collection cans in local businesses

Mentors offer crucial support to young adults (18 plus) with Cystic Fibrosis, in improving socialisation, broadening horizons and exploring concerns to improve self-esteem, enhance coping skills and the persons quality of life. Young people living with this condition have a demanding daily treatment regime at home and sometimes experience limitations that can affect their confidence and ability to cope with the challenges of everyday living. They may also be socially isolated because of their condition. A mentor will meet with a young adult every 2-3 weeks to build a trusting one-to-one relationship allowing the person to explore their feelings, aspirations and grow life skills, to support them in achieving goals or just giving them someone to talk to. Volunteers should also be a driver with access to a car to allow for outings with the young adult. This opportunity also gives the mentor the chance to expand their own experience and enhance their life skills. A commitment of at least a year is sought to allow the young adult time and space to explore their feelings, discuss their fears, develop life skills and grow in the areas where they may be struggling. The mentor will be matched with a young adult in their local area. The volunteer may sometimes take the young adult in the volunteers car to an activity or environment away from home.

This opportunity allows the befriender to make a positive difference for a young person, while also growing their own experience and enhancing their life skills. Befrienders offer one to one support to a young person aged 8 to 18, who has Cystic Fibrosis. Young people living with this condition have a demanding daily treatment regime at home and sometimes experience limitations that can affect their confidence and ability to cope with the challenges of everyday living. They may also be socially isolated because of their condition. A befriender will meet with the young person every 1 to 2 weeks, to build a trusting one to one relationship, taking them out to allow a private space to chat. The volunteer should therefore have access to a car. A commitment of at least a year is sought - this will allow the young person time, space to explore their feelings, discuss their fears, develop life skills and grow in the areas where they may be struggling.

The family support worker is The Butterfly Trusts’ first point of contact with clients in their area, responding to requests that are often for help. The volunteer provides social support in their local community for people affected by Cystic Fibrosis. They offer a listening ear and help to negotiate official systems that include housing, benefits, education, employment and independent living. The support worker role offers an opportunity to utilise your professional or personal life experience for the purpose of enhancing the life of a family or individual living with the impact of Cystic Fibrosis. Training and support is available. Family support workers can also be trained to provide advocacy if they wish to be more challenged, learn new skills or perhaps make good use of those they already have.